A visual prespective on earth science

Samoa Tsunami

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APIA, SAMOA – OCTOBER 03: An aerial view of the devastaion along the South East coastline of Samoa is seen following the 8.3 magnitude strong earthquake which struck 200km from Samoa’s capital Apia on Tuesday, on October 3, 2009 in Apia, Samoa. The quake triggered a tsunami wave up to 1.5 metres across areas of the island, with the official death toll in Samoa standing at 149. A further quake measuring 6.3 struck 85 kilometres south-east of Tonga, but no tsunami warning or additional casualties have been reported as yet. (Photo by Phil Walter/Getty Images)

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LALOMANU, SAMOA – SEPTEMBER 30: A man survey the debris at the beach following yesterday’s 8.3 on the Richter scale strong earthquake which struck 200km from Samoa’s capital Apia at 6.48am local time on September 30, 2009 in Lalomanu, Samoa. The quake triggered a tsunami wave up to 1.5 metres across areas of the island, with a death toll currently sitting at 113 fatalities but expected to rise. (Photo by Phil Walter/Getty Images)

The topography of Tutuila, largest of the islands of American Samoa, is well shown in this color-coded perspective view generated with digital elevation data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM.) On September 29, 2009, a tsunami generated by a major undersea earthquake located about 200 kilometers (120 miles) southwest of Tutuila inundated the more heavily populated southern coast of the island with an ocean surge more than 3 meters (10 feet) deep, causing scores of casualties. Image by     NASA/JPL/NGA

The topography of Tutuila, largest of the islands of American Samoa, is well shown in this color-coded perspective view generated with digital elevation data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM.) On September 29, 2009, a tsunami generated by a major undersea earthquake located about 200 kilometers (120 miles) southwest of Tutuila inundated the more heavily populated southern coast of the island with an ocean surge more than 3 meters (10 feet) deep, causing scores of casualties. Image by NASA/JPL/NGA


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The topography of Savai’i (background) and Upolu (foreground), the two large islands of the Independent State of Samoa, is well shown in this color-coded perspective view generated with digital elevation data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM.)  On September 29, 2009, a tsunami generated by a major undersea earthquake located about 200 kilometers (120 miles) south of Samoa inundated villages on the southern coast of the islands with an ocean surge perhaps more than 3 meters (10 feet) deep. It also impacted the more heavily populated northern coasts with a surge measured at nearly 1.5 meters (4 feet) at the capital city Apia (on Upolu). Image by     NASA/JPL/NGA

The topography of Savai’i (background) and Upolu (foreground), the two large islands of the Independent State of Samoa, is well shown in this color-coded perspective view generated with digital elevation data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM.) On September 29, 2009, a tsunami generated by a major undersea earthquake located about 200 kilometers (120 miles) south of Samoa inundated villages on the southern coast of the islands with an ocean surge perhaps more than 3 meters (10 feet) deep. It also impacted the more heavily populated northern coasts with a surge measured at nearly 1.5 meters (4 feet) at the capital city Apia (on Upolu). Image by NASA/JPL/NGA


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